Papers

Sullivan, J. and Don S. Lee (2018). Soft Power Runs Into Popular Geopolitics: Western Media Frames Democratic Taiwan. International Journal of Taiwan Studies, 1(1).

Sullivan, J. (2017) China Scholars and Twitter. The China Quarterly 229.

Rawnsley, M. Y., Smyth, J. and Sullivan, J. (2016) Taiwanese media reform. Journal of the British Association of Chinese Studies Vol. 6 (Dec).

Sullivan, J. and Smyth, J. (2016) Taiwan’s 2016 presidential and legislative elections. Journal of the British Association of Chinese Studies, Vol 6 (Dec).

Rawnsley, M. T. and Sullivan, J. (2016) Il sistema dei media a Taiwan. Orizzonte Cina 7(1).

Rich, T. and Sullivan, J. (2016) Elections and the Electoral System. In Handbook of Modern Taiwan Politics and Society. Gunter Schubert ed. London: Routledge.

Sullivan, J. and Chen, J. (2015) Ethnicities in Sinophone Cyberspace. Asian Ethnicity 16(3).

Sullivan, J. (2015) Taiwanese Democracy. In Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies. Tim Wright ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sullivan, J. (2014) China scholars and the media. The China Quarterly 220: 1111-1122.

Sullivan, J. (2014) Technology, creativity and the media in engineering China’s futureNew Media & Society 16(3): 527-33.

Sullivan, J. (2014) Democracy in the age of negativity, abundance and hybridityTaiwan Journal of Democracy 10(2): 165-82.

Sullivan, J. (2014) China’s Weibo: Is faster different? New Media & Society 16(1): 24-37.

Horesh, N. and Sullivan, J. (2014) Shanghai. In Oxford Bibliographies in Chinese Studies. Tim Wright ed. New York: Oxford University Press.

Horesh, N., Kim, H., Mauch, P. and Sullivan, J. (2014) Is my rival’s rival a friend? Popular third-party perceptions of territorial disputes in East AsiaCopenhagen Journal of Asian Studies 32(1): 1-25.

Horesh, N. and Sullivan, J. (2014) Examining The End of Revolution: A Foretaste of Wang Hui’s Thought. China Report 50(2): 151-60.

Sullivan, J. (2014) Country Focus: China. Political Insight 5(1): 10-14.

Renz B. and Sullivan J. (2013) Russia’s tweeting governors: Making a connection in the provinces? East European Politics 29(2): 135-51.

Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2013) Strategic cross-Strait discourse: Comparing three presidential terms. China Information 27(1): 11-30.

Renz, B. and Sullivan, J. (2013) Electronic data in Russian politics research. Europe-Asia Studies 65(10): 1898-1911.

Sapir, E., Sullivan, J. and Veen T. (2013)  Scale matters: Addressing the limited robustness of findings on negative advertising. Japanese Journal of Political Science 14(4): 521-541 .

Fell, D., Sapir, E. and Sullivan, J. (2013) Taiwanese parties’ candidate selection in the aftermath of the change of ruling parties. Taiwan Journal of Democracy 9(2): 55-77.

Sullivan, J. (2013). Electronic resources in the study of elite political behaviour in TaiwanThe China Quarterly 203: 172-188

Sullivan, J. (2013) Taiwan’s 2012 presidential electionPolitical Studies Review 11(1): 65-74.

Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2012) Ma Ying-jeou’s presidential discourse. Journal of Current Chinese Affairs 2012 (3): 1-34.

Sullivan, J. (2012) External engagement in Taiwan Studies. Issues and Studies 48(2): 195-215.

Sullivan, J. and Renz, B. (2012) Representing China in the South Pacific. East Asia 29: 377-390.

Sullivan, J. and Seiler-Holmer, G. (2012) Comparing newspaper coverage of China in the South PacificAsia-Pacific Viewpoint 53(2): 196-204.

Sullivan, J. (2012) Teaching Chinese politics: Microblogging and student engagement. Journal of Chinese Political Science, 17(4) 1-15.

Sullivan, J. (2012). A Tale of Two Microblogs in China. Media, Culture & Society 34(6): 773-83.

Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2012). Modeling negative campaign advertising: Evidence from Taiwan. Asian Journal of Communication 64(1): 289-303

Sullivan, J. and Sapir, E. (2012) Nasty or nice? Explaining positive and negative campaigning in Taiwan. The China Journal 67: 149-68.

Sullivan, J. and Seiler-Holmer, G. (2011). Mapping the Taiwan Studies fieldIssues and Studies 47 (3): 1-27.

Sullivan, J. (2011). Is Taiwan Studies in decline? The China Quarterly 207: 706-18.

Sullivan, J. (2011). Trying to make a connection: Bloggers in the Legislative Yuan. American Journal of Chinese Studies, 18(2): 81-96.

Sullivan, J. (2011). Election campaigning since the martial law era. In D. Blundell (Ed.)Taiwan Since Martial Law: Economics, Politics, Society. (Taipei: National Taiwan University Press), pp. 348-74.

Sullivan, J. and Cheon, S. (2011). Reconnecting representatives in two East Asian democraciesEast Asia: An International Quarterly 28(1): 21-36.

Sullivan, J., Li, Y. T., James, P. and Drury, A. C. (2011) An Exchange on “Diversionary Dragons, or ‘Talking Tough in Taipei’”. Journal of East Asian Studies 11(1): 137-52.

Sullivan, J. and Lowe, W. (2010). Chen Shui-bian: On independence. The China Quarterly 203: 619-38.

Sullivan, J. and Renz, B. (2010). Chinese migration: Still the major focus of Russian Far East/Chinese Northeast relations? The Pacific Review 23(2): 261-85.

Sullivan, J. (2010). Legislators’ blogs in Taiwan. Parliamentary Affairs 63(3): 471-85.

Sullivan, J. and Xie, L. (2009). Environmental activism, social networks and the internet. The China Quarterly 198: 422-32.

Sullivan, J. (2009). Defending negativity? Evidence from campaigns in Taiwan. East Asia: An International Quarterly 26(4): 305-20.

Sullivan, J. (2009). Campaign advertising in Taiwanese presidential elections. Journal of Contemporary China 18 (61): 675-88.

Veen, T. and Sullivan, J. (2009). News sources and decision-making in the EU CouncilGovernment and Opposition 44(4): 471-75.

Sullivan, J. and Veen, T. (2009). The Council of Ministers: Shedding light on an opaque institution. Government and Opposition 44(1): 113-23.

Sullivan, J. (2008). Campaign advertising and democracy in Taiwan. The China Quarterly196: 900-11.

Sullivan, J. and Selck, T. (2007). Political preferences, revealed positions and strategic votes: Explaining decision-making in the EU Council. Journal of European Public Policy 14(7): 1150-61.

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